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Introduction to Cannabinoids and Terpenes

Just discovering cannabis? Re-discovering cannabis? Things can get confusing, and we don’t blame you! Our team has formulated OLO strips to highlight the best parts of cannabis, particularly, its brilliant ability to naturally tap into inspiration, sensation, creativity, and the feeling of being centered and mellowed. Don’t you want to know how? It all comes down to a few basic concepts – backed by science – that we ran over 450 consumer tests on in order to perfect.

 

Here’s what you need to know:

 

There are 113 known chemical compounds naturally occurring in the cannabis plant. These compounds, commonly referred to as cannabinoids, are what we can thank for the plant’s enjoyable, wellness-inducing properties.

Cannabinoids are processed through the human body’s endocannabinoid system. That’s right — humans, in addition to birds, reptiles, and other mammals, are born with anatomical systems that respond to (and process) cannabinoids.

According to Bradley E. Alger, PhD., “Endocannabinoids and their receptors are found throughout the body: in the brain, organs, connective tissues, glands, and immune cells. In each tissue, the cannabinoid system performs different tasks, but the goal is always the same: homeostasis, the maintenance of a stable internal environment despite fluctuations in the external environment.”

CB1 and CB2 are the two known receptors that respond to cannabinoid exposure in the body. There are actually 10 times the amount of CB1 receptors in the brain than there are μ-opioid receptors, which respond to opioids such as morphine!

 

Some of the most common cannabinoids found in cannabis are:

 

THC –  THC is possibly the most well-known cannabinoid in the world. It’s sometimes referred to by it’s full name, Tetrahydrocannabinol, and less frequently by it’s mouthful of a scientific name, (–)-trans-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol. THC is the psychoactive cannabinoid generally responsible for the feelings of elation and euphoria that humans associate with being “high.”

CBD – Recently gaining tons of popularity, CBD is a non-psychoactive cannabinoid found in cannabis and hemp. It’s frequently utilized for its pain relieving, anti-insomnia, antibacterial, anti-convulsive, and appetite-stimulating effects. Strains like ACDC, Sour Tsunami, and Pennywise naturally contain higher levels of CBD.

CBN – CBN is a cannabinoid completely unique to the cannabis plant. It forms when THC degrades and is sometimes referred to as the “sleepy” cannabinoid, due to it’s heavily sedating properties. It also acts as an appetite stimulant, frequently recommended to patients undergoing chemotherapy. CBN can also act as a vasorelaxant, which is why it commonly sought out by people with high blood pressure, glaucoma, hypertension, and heart disease. Strains like Durban Poison, Lemon Kush, and Blackberry are higher in CBN than others.

THCV – Although THCV is very close in molecular structure to THC, in low doses, it’s non-psychoactive, but at higher doses, that can change. Contrary to CBN, THCV generally acts as an appetite suppressant. THCV is being heavily researched for it’s potential to regulate blood sugar and offset insulin resistance. THCV can be found in strains like Willie Nelson, Durban Cheese, and Pineapple Purps.

CBC – Short for Cannabichromene, CBC is another non-psychoactive cannabinoid that responds to pain receptors in the body, showing particular promise in patients with osteoarthritis. It has also been found to promote healthy brain function.

These days, cannabinoids are frequently isolated for their medicinal properties, especially those without psychoactive traits. Products that contain isolated cannabinoids are generally referred to as isolates. Although isolates may seem like great news for those seeking no-strings-attached relief, research has shown that whole plant medicine, otherwise known as full-spectrum, is more effective in treating bodily issues like inflammation and pain than isolates. This synergistic, multi-cannabinoid experience is called the entourage effect.

Terpenes are introduced to the equation in order to provide users with a truly advanced (and tasty) entourage experience. They’re the molecular compounds found in botanical plants, giving them their unique tastes, smells, and flavors. Terpenes are found in everything from fruits to pine trees, herbs, and even cannabis.

 

Here are some of the terpenes most commonly found in cannabis:

 

Myrcene –  Myrcene is found in mangos, lemongrass, hops, and thyme, and has a strong presence in strains like Chemdawg and Agent Orange. It has an earthy, musky, vaguely citrus aroma. The amount of myrcene present in each cannabis strain helps dictate a strain’s classification as either an Indica or a Sativa. Myrcene has powerful anti-inflammatory, sedative, and muscle-relaxing properties.

Limonene – Recognizable from it’s presence in black pepper, celery, dill, fennel, citrus, mentha, and more, limonene has a robust lemony and orange aroma, and is found in high concentrations in strains like Green Crack and Girl Scout Cookies. The properties in limonene are thought to positively impact mood, and aid in the control of anxiety, depression, and nausea.

alpha-Pinene – With woody and piney notes, alpha-Pinene is found in strains like vanilla kush and 9lb Hammer. It’s thought to help with memory and focus, and in low doses, it serves as a bronchodilator in humans.

Linalool – Known for its sweet, floral, citrusy aroma, linalool is found in lavender. Linalool also shows itself in strains like Sour Diesel and Bubblegum. It has sedating, anti-anxiety properties.

Humulene – Humulene has a woody, earthy aroma with a hint of spice. In nature, humulene is found in clove, basil, hops, and cannabis. It’s ever-present in strains like Gorilla Glue #4 and Liberty Haze. Humulene has anti-tumor properties, and much like THCV is thought to be an appetite suppressant.

Eucalyptol – Also known as cineol, this terpene is responsible for the cool sensations that accompany a whiff of mint, rosemary, and tea tree oil. A 2012 study alluded that cineol contributed to an improvement in cognition and that it may serve as a potential aid in the easing of symptoms related to Alzheimer’s Disease. Strains like Super Silver Haze, Headband, and Bubba Kush naturally contain high levels of eucalyptol.

 

OLO has teamed up with an extensive team of biochemists, neuroscientists, psychologists, and strain hunters to formulate full-spectrum, terpene-rich, pesticide-free products in compliance with California state law. Our products are third-party lab tested to ensure potency, purity, and the presence of a full range of cannabinoids that encourage a proper entourage experience following each use. OLO 5 mg strips and OLO 10 mg strips are sourced using cannabis distillate from local California farms.

More questions about OLO discreet sublingual strips, cannabinoids, or terpenes? Reach out to us at Info@GetOLO.com. Master the experience, discover new serenity, find deeper immersion, and forge new connections. Get OLO.

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DISCLAIMER: OLO’S CANNABIS PRODUCTS ARE PRODUCED AND DISTRIBUTED IN COMPLIANCE WITH CALIFORNIA STATE LAW AND ARE PRODUCED AND DISTRIBUTED FOR CONSUMERS 21 YEARS OF AGE AND OLDER. WARNING! MAY CAUSE DROWSINESS. DO NOT OPERATE ANY MOTOR VEHICLE, RECREATIONAL VEHICLE, OR HEAVY EQUIPMENT WHILE UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF CANNABIS PRODUCTS. KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN
Licenses:
CDPH-T00000015 - Adult Use Cannabis
CDPH-T00000016 - Medical